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November 8 – December 6, 2008
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 8, 7:00 – 10:00pm
Live Jazz by HR-57 Allstars

 

Hamiltonian Gallery and Hamiltonian Artists proudly present the works of photographers Jonathan B. French, Michael Dax Iacovone and Anne Chan. Through process and subject matter, each artist uniquely investigates relationships between themselves and their environment via the thread of dislocation and reconnection.

In his latest photographic installation, Jonathan B. French brings into focus the relationships between dislocated Africans in the Americas and their brothers and sisters throughout the rest of the world. French floods the viewer with faces from his travels around the world, and through his documentary-style photography, the viewer gets glimpses into each one of their stories. French wants to bring these “Family Pictures” of Africans in the Americas to their extended family in the United States so that they may be reconnected culturally after so many years of displacement. This body of works points out that we all do share the same struggles, priorities and needs. In turn, he hopes that we choose to further explore the cultural diversity of these communities and embrace our commonalities.

Anne Chan creates a pristinely constructed world of her own, full of long, sleek boardroom tables and skyscrapers devoid of its usual inhabitants, but is actually far too familiar for many. By implementing corporate culture’s most common product – the staple – Chan creates tiny dioramas. Through the use of scale and lighting, Chan shifts the attention away from the hidden labor involved in their production, and to the critique of cubicle farm-life and its monotonous, inflexible, contrived hierarchy full of disengaged drones.

Overlapping image upon image in his panoramic photographs, Michael Dax Iacovone creates ethereal, episodic landscapes of Washington, DC. In using a simple process and mathematics, Iacovone developed a unique method based on spatial dislocation that casts off traditional documentary photography techniques that are generally focused on composition. Instead, through his calculated shooting sequence, which utilizes a simple plastic Holga camera and a chest-level shooting style, Iacovone allows the images to compose themselves and the single roll of film reconnect back into a visual diary of his journey and becomes a singular representation of the spaces that he traveled through.