See what DC has been saying about "Permacounterculture," orchestrated by Naoko Wowsugi! Exhibition closes September 10.

"Naoko Wowsugi: Permacounterculture"
Plantpop, by Leon Guanzon

The political, anti-establishment lyrics are one of the things that define punk music. It’s a genre that desires to break away from the norms. So what does punk music have to do with plants?
Art professor at American University in Washington, DC, Naoko Wowsugi, seeks to answer probing questions like these using the art world as her platform. Read more.

Image: Farrah Skeiky

Image: Farrah Skeiky

"With 'Permacounterculture,' Naoko Wowsugi Turns Hamiltonian Gallery Into a Green House and a Punk Venue"
Washington City Paper, by Kriston Capps

The best time to see Naoko Wowsugi’s latest solo show may be when it’s blessedly quiet. That’s not at all what the artist has in store for viewers. “Permacounterculture,” her show at Hamiltonian Gallery, is an invitational series of noise and hardcore shows in a garage of sorts that’s built inside the gallery. This is an art show that comes with ear-plugs. Read more.

Image: Alex Shelldorf

Image: Alex Shelldorf

"In a new exhibit, a DC Art Gallery will transform into a punk music venue that doubles as a greenhouse"
DC Music Download, by Jordan Snowden

Punk music and urban farming might seem like two very separate worlds, but local artist Naoko Wowsugi intends to bring them together for a bold new exhibit that’s opening this weekend.
When Permacounterculture is unveiled at the Hamiltonian on Aug. 13, the art gallery will transform into a punk music venue that doubles as a greenhouse for wheatgrass. The exhibit will create an unconventional ecosystem where live music and sustainable living coincide with one another. Read more.

Image: Alex Schelldorf

Image: Alex Schelldorf

"How To Cultivate Plants Using Just Water, Nutrients And A Steady Diet Of D.C. Punk" 
WAMU, by Ally Schweitzer

Many have heard the conventional wisdom that talking to plants helps them grow. But what about playing music for them? A new exhibit in D.C. is testing that idea — and like many experiments throughout history, it begins in a garage.

On a recent morning, that garage is being built from the ground up at Hamiltonian Gallery on U Street NW. Clad in spiky accessories and plenty of black, Kohei Urakami is cracking open a can of gray paint, preparing to coat pieces of lumber. He's working for artist Naoko Wowsugi, the brains behind a new art show-slash-science project called "Permacounterculture." Read more.

Image: Alex Schelldorf

Image: Alex Schelldorf

"This DC Art Gallery Is Using Punk Rock to Grow Plants" 
Washingtonian, by Sarah Stodder

You’ve probably taken a shot of wheatgrass before — it’s a thick, green liquid, sweet at first and followed by a bitter aftertaste of, well, grass. If you’ve heard about wheatgrass’ numerous health benefits, the setting was probably an upscale juice bar, and the person who told you was probably peppy and clad in Lululemon.

You’ve probably never heard about wheatgrass while attending a punk show. But that’s what’s happening at Hamiltonian Gallery over the next few weeks: “Wheatgrass juice acts as a detergent the body can use,” the lead singer of the band Heatwave panted into the mic as he paced the stage between his drummer and guitarist last Saturday night. “And it acts as a body deodorant, which I will need after this set.” You also probably haven’t heard a punk band rave about wheatgrass in the middle of a white-walled art gallery — but that’s exactly what artist Naoko Wowsugi wants you to experience. Read more.